The difference between etc and eth

“One” That’s right, this is ETH (what the hell, etc.

There was a stolen incident in Ethereum before, which was very shocking. The founder of Ethereum claimed that it could be passed through Change the calculation method to retrieve these lost coins, so Ethereum conducts a hard fork, but not everyone supports this fork, so some people still insist on the original algorithm unchanged, so, The one that insists on the original computing chain is ETC, and the main chain after the fork is now Ethereum. The founder of EOS is DM, who is inspired to become a blockchain operating system, and the relationship with Ethereum should be based on Ethereum. Developed, the mainnet will be launched in June this year, and the value should increase greatly. At present, these three currencies are traded on multiple platforms. The ones that support fiat currencies include: BtcTrade International Station, Huobi, ok, etc., and support the use of ETH and BTC For exchange, there are Binance, Coinegg, etc.

『II』 Do you need two wallets to send etc and eth?

ifcfg-eth0 is the first network card The configuration file
ifcfg-eth1 is the configuration file of the second network card
For example:
#cd /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts
#cat ifcfg-eth0 #View The first piece of network card configuration
DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=static #static IP address

『Three』 Do you need two wallets to send etc and eth

p>

ifcfg-eth0 is the configuration file of the first network card
ifcfg-eth1 is the configuration file of the second network card
For example:
#cd /etc/sysconfig/ network-scripts
#cat ifcfg-eth0 #View the first NIC configuration
DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=static #Static IP address

『4』etc or eth which is more valuable for investment

These two versions both provide the same technology platform, and according to the developers, their views on the next development roadmap are also the same. However, This small difference has spawned two markets with a combined total value of about $1.2 billion.

『Wu』What is the difference between virtual currency etc and eth

p>

is actually not much difference Yes, because Ethereum has been stolen, how safe it was and how awesome the technology was, has been slapped in the face. In order to divert users’ attention, a new currency was created.
I’m really speechless about this type of currency, and I can’t compare it with bitcoin, Ritecoin, and Litecoin, which don’t often advocate technology.

『LU』 What are BTC, LTC, ETH, ETC, BCH?

They are:

Bitcoin

The concept of Bitcoin (BitCoin) was originally proposed by Satoshi Nakamoto in 2009, and the open source software designed and released according to the ideas of Satoshi Nakamoto and the P2P network built on it. Bitcoin is a P2P form of digital currency. Peer-to-peer transmission means a decentralized payment system.

Bitcoin Cash

Bitcoin Cash is a new version of Bitcoin with different configurations launched by a small group of Bitcoin developers.

(6) The difference between etc and eth is extended reading:

Virtual currency refers to non-real currency. Well-known virtual currencies such as Internet coins of Internet companies, Q coins of Tencent companies, Q points, coupons of Shanda companies, micro coins launched by Sina (used in micro games, Sina reading, etc.), chivalrous ingots (used in chivalrous Taoist games, etc.) ), silver pattern (for Bixue Qingtian game).

The popular digital currencies in 2013 include Bitcoin, Litecoin, Unlimited Coin, Quark Coin, Zeta Coin, BBQ Coin, Penny Coin (external network), Invisible Gold Bar, Red Coin, Prime Coin. At present, there are hundreds of digital currencies issued around the world. The legend of “bit gold, Wright silver, infinite copper, penny aluminum” is popular in the circle.

『柒』 The difference between ethereum, ether, etc and eth, 90% of people are deceived

Ether is the token of ethereum , etc and etc are the two coins after the fork of Ethereum, Huobi has already launched eth

『渌』 What is ETC/Ethereum Classic

A Brief History of Ethereum Classic (ETC)

Ethernet Classic began with an unfortunate event.

In May 2016, the Decentralized Autonomous Organization (DAO) held a token sale with the goal of establishing a blockchain-based venture capital to fund future decentralization within the Ethereum ecosystem Applications (DApps).

Basically, a DAO is a complex smart contract that operates in a decentralized fashion – computer code that automatically executes tasks among multiple parties when conditions are met.

Despite its ambitious goals and successful token sale, the DAO’s code has a major vulnerability that allows attackers to steal ETH from the decentralized organization.

An attacker exploited this vulnerability in June 2016, leading to the infamous DAO hack, which maliciously stole approximately $50 million worth of ETH.

�Undoubtedly, the DAO hack shocked the Ethereum community and caused the price of ETH to drop from $20 to $13.

After the DAO hack, the Ethereum community had to choose from three options.

  • Do nothing and try to withstand the consequences of the attack; or

  • Initiate a soft fork and recover funds; or

  • Deploy a hard fork to recover lost ETH.

  • Soft forks and hard forks are both major network upgrades. However, soft forks allow non-upgraded users and upgraded users to communicate with each other, while hard forks are not backward compatible with previous versions.

    As developers realized that deploying a soft fork would expose the network to a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack, the Ethereum community decided to initiate a hard fork to recover funds lost in the DAO hack.

    While the proposal is supported by the majority, a small minority in the Ethereum community is opposed, arguing that “code is law” and that blockchain networks should be immutable .

    The failure of both parties to agree on a solution eventually led to the split of the Ethereum blockchain.

    Those who were trying to get back their lost ETH opted for a hard fork that opened the Ethereum (ETH) blockchain as we know it today, while another group stayed with the original Ethereum Classic ( ETC) on the chain.

    What problems does Ethereum Classic solve?

    Ethereum Classic (ETC) is a blockchain platform that allows developers to deploy smart contracts and DApps.

    While this functionality is identical to that of Ethereum (ETH), the ETC blockchain has two main differences.

    First of all, the Ethereum Classic community opposes tampering with distributed ledgers and supports the view that “blockchain networks cannot and should not be modified”.

    Secondly, while there is no hard cap on the total supply of ETH, Ethereum Classic adopts a constant supply monetary policy that allows a maximum of 230 million ETC to be created.

    As a bonus, Ethereum Classic launched the Atlantis hard fork last year to increase interactivity with Ethereum and improve the privacy protection of transactions through zk-SNARKS.

    Ethereum Classic ETC recommended trading platform

    Huobi, OKEX, AAX, etc.

“Nine” hard fork in the blockchain, what does ethereum classic ETC mean

A brief history of ethereum classic (ETC)

p>

Ethereum Classic began with an unfortunate event.

In May 2016, the Decentralized Autonomous Organization (DAO) held a token sale with the goal of establishing a blockchain-based venture capital to fund future decentralization within the Ethereum ecosystem Applications (DApps).

Basically, a DAO is a complex smart contract that operates in a decentralized fashion – computer code that automatically executes tasks among multiple parties when conditions are met.

Despite its ambitious goals and successful token sale, the DAO’s code has a major vulnerability that allows attackers to steal ETH from the decentralized organization.

An attacker exploited this vulnerability in June 2016, leading to the infamous DAO hack, which maliciously stole approximately $50 million worth of ETH.

There is no doubt that the DAO hack shocked the Ethereum community and caused the price of ETH to drop from $20 to $13.

After the DAO hack, the Ethereum community had to choose from three options.

  • Do nothing and try to bear the consequences of the attack;

  • Start a soft fork and recover funds;

  • p>

  • Deploy a hard fork to recover lost ETH.

  • Soft forks and hard forks are both major network upgrades. However, soft forks allow non-upgraded users and upgraded users to communicate with each other, while hard forks are not backward compatible with previous versions.

    As developers realized that deploying a soft fork would expose the network to a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack, the Ethereum community decided to initiate a hard fork to recover funds lost in the DAO hack.

    While the proposal is supported by the majority, a small minority in the Ethereum community is opposed, arguing that “code is law” and that blockchain networks should be immutable .

    The failure of both parties to agree on a solution eventually led to the split of the Ethereum blockchain.

    Those who were trying to get back their lost ETH opted for a hard fork that opened the Ethereum (ETH) blockchain as we know it today, while another group stayed with the original Ethereum Classic ( ETC) on the chain.

    What problems does Ethereum Classic solve?

    Ethereum Classic (ETC) is a blockchain platform that allows developers to deploy smart contracts and DApps.

    While this functionality is identical to that of Ethereum (ETH), the ETC blockchain has two main differences.

    First of all, the Ethereum Classic community opposes tampering with distributed ledgers and supports the view that “blockchain networks cannot and should not be modified”.

    Secondly, while there is no hard cap on the total ETH supply, Ethereum Classic adopts a constant supply monetary policy that allows a maximum of 230 million ETC to be created.

    As a bonus, Ethereum Classic launched the Atlantis hard fork last year to increase interactivity with Ethereum and improve the privacy protection of transactions through zk-SNARKS.

    The recommended trading platform for Ethereum Classic ETC: Huobi, OKEX, AAX, etc.

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